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Posts Tagged ‘Apple’

Activating OS X’s Builtin Apache Web Server and PHP

14 Jan

As I mentioned in my prior post OS X Command-line Dev Tools—Install Shortcut, OS X comes with a variety of built-in tools suited for developers. Unfortunately, Apple has seen fit to hide one of the most important of them: the web server. Despite that, they are easily unlocked if you know how. This applies to Mountain Lion (10.8) and (though I haven’t tried it, yet) Mavericks (10.9). Though you can install separate installations, I don’t like to install anything extra, unless I must. Read the rest of this entry »

 

Command line clipboard in OSX and Cygwin

03 Dec

I use the command line a lot, even though I am on a graphical user-interface like Windows or OSX. And since I’m lazy, I write a lot of scripts to perform repetitive tasks. The downside of command-line is that there is no standard way to interact with GUI features. I stumbled across a command in OSX, recently that allows command line programs to copy/paste between the clipboard that we’re so used to using.

OSX pbpaste and pbcopy

OSX has two commands, pbpaste and pbcopy, Read the rest of this entry »

 

I Just Want to Submit a Frickin’ iPhone App to the App Store! (Part 3)

28 Jul

Way back in in “I Just Want to Create a Frickin’ iPhone App! (Part 1),” I walked you through the logistics of joining the developer program (no, you didn’t miss “Part 2,” I have not written it yet). Fast-forward a couple of months and it’s time to submit to the app store! For a company that has built a reputation on simplicity, Apple has concocted an arcane process and made it worse by not providing any complete nor accurate information to help with the application submission process.  Apple’s minimalistic approach is of no help… you often feel like your flying blind as you try to make your way through the process. I’ll try to give some heads-up and clarity if you, too, are going through this for the first time.

So, let’s hope I can remember all that I went through.

  1. Create specific App ID: iOS Provisioning PortalApp IDsNew App ID.  (Note: you cannot delete App IDs once they are created).
    1. Enter a name for this application. This is just for reference; it will not appear to a user.
    2. Select the “Bundle Seed ID”. Normally you will want to select the one that was assigned to you, in the drop down.
    3. Define the App ID Suffix.  This has to match the ID that is bound into the application, so you will probably want to copy the one assigned to the application you’ve been building, lest it be recognized as an entirely new application. This is not critical, but if you have beta testers and you change the App ID, the next update will not overwrite the older version of the app, they will have to delete the old one, explicitly.To find (or change) the current Bundle identifier in Xcode 4.x, select the Target of the project. The Summary tab shows the Bundle identifier in the “Identifier” field; or, in the “Info” tab, it shown as “Bundle identifier”. Of course, these settings come from the project’s .plist file, so you can access its “CFBundleIdentifier” (aka “Bundle identifier”) explicitly. The value in the app should be the reverse domain name, for example, “com.handthingsdown.htdmobile”; do not prefix the “Bundle Seed ID” to the bundle identifier in the app.
    4. This value should match the Bundle Identifier field when creating a new App ID. As noted in the “How To” tab, you can use wildcards for this value; however, a fully qualified ID is necessary to utilize the various services (e.g., Push Notification, Game Center, iCloud).
  2. Create an App Store provisioning file:  iOS Provisioning Portal →ProvisioningDistributionNew Profile.
    1. Be sure the “Distribution Method” is set to “App Store”.
    2. Select the App ID from the previous step to associate with your application.
    3. You wont have to — or be able to — select devices to include, as you would for ad hoc provisioning.
  3. Once the profile has been created, download and add it to your Xcode profiles.
  4. Create an archive build of your application, build for release and utilizing the App Store provisioning profile.
    1. If you haven’t already, you may want to duplicate the Release build-configuration to “Distribution App Store” (making sure that the target is not selected go to Xcode’s menu: Editor →Add Configuration →Duplicate “Release” Configuration.
    2. In the project’s target’s go to Build Settings →Code Signing →Code Signing Identity.  Below the build configuration you will use to build the Archive, set the “Any iOS SDK” setting to the provisioning profile you created for distribution to the App Store. (For the build configuration itself, I selected “Don’t Code Sign”; but I do not know if that matters).
    3. Modify build scheme’s Archive to use the build configuration you configured and build the Archive.
    4. From the Organizer’s Archive view, select and “Validate…” the binary. This performs (only) some tests of the module before uploading.
    5. We will jump away from Xcode for a moment….
  5. So you thought you were done signing up with programs with Apple? First an Apple ID, then the Developer Center, then an iOS Developer, and now iTunes Connect, itunesconnect.apple.com. Go to a web page and set up an account. This is where you will manage the applications that you submit to the App Store.
  6. Once your account is created, go to “Manage Your Apps” and select “Add New App”.
  7. Fill in the app name, SKU, and select a Bundle ID. Note that none of these settings can be changed once the app has been accepted by Apple.
  8. Click the “Ready to Upload Binary” button to start the process. The upload does not occur via the web page.
  9. Go back to Xcode. Since the Archive was just built, the Organizer window should be open with the Archive view shown. Be sure the correct Archive is selected (at the top of the list).
  10. Upload your application to Apple. There is the new, complicated way (which I used) and an old simpler way, that should still work—so I hear. So, back to Xcode…
    1. First, the old, simple way.  Ignore the messages on the iTunes Connect web page about the Application Loader. From Xcode’s Organizer window’s Archive’s view, click the “Submit…” button. That’s it!
    2. Now the difficult way:
      1. Click the “Share…” button. to build “iOS App Store Package”
      2. Select App Store certificate
      3. Open Application Loader and follow its steps to upload the .ipa file that was created in Xcode.
  11. Once the module has been submitted, there are additional automated checks that take place. So, wait an hour or so and check back at the iTunes Connect page. The status should change, if the module was accepted. If not, check your email to see what kind of errors may have occurred.
  12. If it passed the automated checks, you can now wait nervously for actual humans to vette the application. Expect this to take a full week.
Good Luck! Let me know what your experiences are.

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I Just Want to Create a Frickin’ iPhone App! (Part 1)

15 Mar
Hand Things Down’s first iPhone application

Hand Things Down’s first iPhone application

We had a big deadline, yesterday, to have an iPhone app running. For those of you who who’ve heard about the multitude of hurdles that you have to cross in order to get an iPhone app working, I will summarize my experience over the past couple of weeks. I am not even talking about submitting an app to the Apple App Store, only to get it running on a device.  If you read no further, know this: DO NOT WAIT until the last minute and think you can do this in an hour; there are logistics that involve faxing(!!) and people at Apple, so it will take days. Hopefully some hints, here will help to trim that down.

Here are the steps (from memory):

  1. Join the Apple Developer Connection (developer.apple.com).  This is free and it will give you access to bunch technical information and videos (but not all!). This step is quick and painless.
    1. Find your way through one of the Dev Center links or just go to developer.apple.com/programs/register.
    2. Be sure that the email address and name are what you want to use because they will verify subsequent information, later (in the certificate used to run your app on your actual device).
    3. You will need to verify the email address through the email they send you. This is automated, so it shouldn’t take long.
  2. Once you have registered, you can also download the iOS SDK so that you can develop an application and run it in its simulator. This, of course is the same SDK you’d use for iPod Touch and iPad development.
  3. You have to have Mac OS Snow Leopard (10.6.4) or later to install the SDK… expect an upgrade from 10.5 to take 2-3 hours, after the update patches that might be required, are also applied.

  4. To run your application on an iPod Touch, iPhone, or iPad, you need to join and pay for the “iOS Developer Program.” This process isn’t specific to iOS; you will be able to opt into one of Apple’s three developer programs, iOS, Mac, and Safari. The first two cost $99. and the latter is free.
  5. I needed to register our company as the “developer” so that any applications are released under the company’s name, rather than my own. Apple wants to verify that it is a legitimate entity; so they sent an email asking me to fax proof of the company’s validity (Fax?!! Really, Apple?! Really?!!). They manually review the paperwork before anything else happens. By taking the time to read this blog-post, you can avoid the time and frustration I had to go through (they never processed my fax):
    Apple Dev Program company paperwork request

    Apple Dev Program company paperwork request

    Call Apple Developer Support at one of their phone numbers—for the US, call (408) 974-4897 or (800) 633-2152, Mon-Fri, 9:00AM-7:00PM CST. Tell them that you’d faxed your paperwork in 3 or 4-days ago. If you are nice, they will send you an email where you can attach your paperwork and email back!

    That little tid-bit might save you days of waiting. If you are an individual developer, then this might not apply.

  6. You will get another confirmation email, “Information Received Regarding Your Enrollment,” from them as soon as the support person does whatever they do. You’ve yet to pay, however. I had to wait for another 2-days to receive an “Apple Developer Program Enrollment Update” email. If you do not receive this email, you can try writing your support contact again or try the link that you will eventually get, to see if you can proceed: developer.apple.com/ios/enroll/purchaseProgram.action. It took me two days to get this email. I was then able to pay.
  7. The next day I received an invoice and the confirmation email “Thank You for Joining an Apple Developer Program,” and I was no longer beholden to the black-box procedures of Apple (as far as I know… see my next posting). Now I have access to the additional technical information and I am able to go through the logistics of deploying my app to my iPhone, for the first time.

Total time, for me: 11 days, most of it waiting on Apple!! Hopefully this post will allow you to cut a week off that time. Happy programming!

 
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