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Command line clipboard in macOS and Cygwin

03 Dec

I use the command line a lot, even though I am on a graphical user-interface like Windows or macOS. And since I’m lazy, I write a lot of scripts to perform repetitive tasks. The downside of command-line is that there is no standard way to interact with GUI features. I stumbled across a command in macOS, recently that allows command line programs to copy/paste between the clipboard that we’re so used to using.

macOS pbpaste and pbcopy

macOS has two commands, pbpaste and pbcopy, which “paste” from the pasteboard to stdout and copies from stdin to the pasteboard, respectively Read the rest of this entry »

 

Syncing Github Forks

26 Nov

GitHub_LogoGithub has become the place to manage source code—it’s free, robust, and commonly accessible. Github repositories are owned and access to change them must be enabled by the owner. Still, you can make changes to a Github repository; but a “pull request” must be sent to contributors of the repository and they can accept the change at their discretion. Keeping changes in sync when you don’t have direct change privileges may not be obvious.

One-time Github Changes Read the rest of this entry »

 

PHP Recipe to Show Source-code

19 Nov

PHP source-code display recipeHere is a simple Web 1.5 (static HTML with a little bit of styling and JavaScript) recipe to allow a viewer of your web page to see the PHP source-code, behind it, with a minimal amount of JavaScript and a little CSS manipulation—good for showing the work you’ve done to others. Or for embedding in your own source, in debug mode, so that teammates can see each others’ work.

See the example code at: http://cachecrew.com/sample_code/highlight_file.php and http://cachecrew.com//sample_code/highlight_file2.php.

The PHP and HTML Read the rest of this entry »

 

OS X Command-line Dev Tools—Install Shortcut

12 Nov

Xcode command-line toolsAmong those around me, in world of tech startups (even in the vicinity of the world of Windows), MacBooks are used almost universally. I can’t explain the discrepancy between what I see around me and the data you usually read; but I do know that as a technical platform, OS X provides an easier path to development tools. These days, the world driven by web-based applications. A majority of those applications run on Linux-based machines. OS X shares with Linux, a common ancestor, Unix. So, a robust array of common commands come with OS X—ssh, ftp, bash, vi, emacs, etc. But more importantly, OS X comes pre-installed with hottest development tools used for web development, today—Ruby, Python, PHP, Apache, memcache, etc. This means a developer can write web applications without even being connected to the Internet!

There are more tools available with the free download of Xcode, Read the rest of this entry »

 

Self-documenting Bash Scripts Using Heredoc

22 Jul

It is surprising how quickly we forget how to use scripts we had written, let alone, what they were for. So it is even more difficult for others to know how and whether to use your script. You can avoid wasting the efforts you put into the problems you solved with your script by simply adding some friendly “help” output.

Here is some basic information you should include:

  • Summary description
  • Form of use—basic syntactic usage
  • Description of usage syntax; i.e., input parameters
  • More detailed information, if necessary. Read the rest of this entry »
 

Business Cards are Still Relevant

21 May

Bill Lee Photographer: Business cardsEven though a lot of people in the startup world can get by without exchanging tangible calling cards—using Bump to exchange contact information, for example—handing over an actual card can leave a longer lasting impression. I wrote about what to include on a business card in my other blog, focused on photography, and the business of photography, so I’ll simply reference it from here.

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Pitch Perfect Elevator Pitch

10 May

Elevator for your elevator pitchI worked with and advised a lot of small and startup companies over the past couple of years. When meeting a new founder, I ask what they do. Often times they ramble on for a while and I have to discern what it is that they do. So, I try to head off the rambling and ask them to tell me their “elevator pitch.” If they’ve been in the startup-community for more that a few months, then they should know what that means—often they don’t.

The Elevator Pitch

What is an elevator pitch? It is the statement that you could make to a chance encounter in an elevator—the person who might be your first investor—and finish before they get off the elevator. Everyone should have an elevator pitch that they can recite without hesitation. The goal is for that person to invite you for a longer conversation; not to tell them everything about your venture.

Elements of an Elevator Pitch

Since you never know how long the elevator ride will be, you want to make sure to cover the most essential elements of the pitch, first. Start with a 30-second pitch (perhaps even less!) and make sure you cover these points:

  • Who is your audience?
  • What is their “problem” or pain-point?
  • What is your solution?

If you are in the elevator with someone with the means to finance you, then your ride will be longer. Extend your statement to include more detail:

  • What is your “special-sauce”?
  • What is your business model?
  • What is your “traction” and/or revenue?

With more time, you can cover:

  • Your team
  • Competition

You should have practiced different length versions of your pitch: 15-seconds, 30-seconds, 1 minute, 3 minute. Any longer than that probably involves an invitation rather than an elevator ride—in which case, you should follow Guy Kawasaki’s 10/20/30 rule from his blog, book, The Art of the Start, or talk. Practice your pitches so that they are articulated crisply and with confidence without sounding mechanical. Be sure that your passion comes though.

Another good summary on the broader topic of presentation preparation: How to Present and Pitch.

 

 
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Server Handling of Accept HTTP Headers

31 Aug

When a browser (or any web client) requests content from a web server, it can tell the server what types of content type it can interpret (HTML, text, audio, etc.). The underlying HTTP protocol allows these to be specified via “header” settings—metadata that is sent before any actual content, describing characteristics about the content. The browser can send an “Accept” header—to describe what it accepts—and the server responds with a “Content-type” header. The Accept header can be quite elaborate, but what happens when what happens when these conflict? Read the rest of this entry »

 

The ccPhp Framework: Installation

24 May

I have a whole series of posts, waiting in draft, describing my evolving PHP framework, I call ccPhp. If you have nothing better to do than play with someone else’s dalliances, then here is a quick installation guide.  A little backwards, because I’ve yet to publish reasons why you’d want to. But, if, after my eventual publications describe this framework, you decide to install it, this is the quickest place to see how to do that.

The following describes only one way to arrange the setup.  I have designed the framework with few cross-dependencies.  After my “standard” setup description, I will describe the few file dependencies so that you easily define your own file organization. (If you are on Windows, you can extrapolate the appropriate things to do there). Read the rest of this entry »

 

Crushed Under the Tower of Software-Babble

02 May

BNF Syntax diagrams

I think my brain cells are shrinking—it is unbelievable how quickly I forget. Such is the life of a software developer, these days.It is amazing how quickly I can forget the details of one programming language detail over another after just a few weeks away—when I see my old code, I amaze myself at how good a programmer I was… last month! Read the rest of this entry »