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Posts Tagged ‘programming’

Promises, Promises… Timeout!

25 Apr

I was playing with ES6’s new Promises, for the first time, this week. Then, I was looking at the ugliness of using a browser’s setTimeout() function and thought that it would look better as a Promise.

tl;dr summary: A Simple Promise Version of “setTimeout()”

If we do it right, you simply specify the timeout period and implement a handler for then() to invoke:

timeout(5000) // Delay for 5000 ms
   .then(function () {
      // Do, here, whatever should happen when the time has elapsed…
   });

Or, since this is ES6, we might as well use arrow-function shorthand:

timeout(5000).then( () => {
   // do your thing, here…
})

Implementation

The setTimeout() already functions a bit like a Promise, without matching the promise-pattern and syntax, so converting it to a Promise is pretty easy: Read the rest of this entry »

 
 

git “Getting Started” Tips

21 Jan

git is has become one of the most popular source code control tools on the planet. Even if you’re coming from another source control system, becoming proficient with git can take some time. The best place to start is by running through the git Tutorial. Before that, you might take a look at the GitGuys article to get a quick synopsis of git concepts. Also, though slightly out of date, keeping the following diagram in front of you will help as well. It shows the git command-line commands that “move” file changes from one place to another in the git data-store hierarchy. Read the rest of this entry »

 
 

Syncing Github Forks

26 Nov

GitHub_LogoGithub has become the place to manage source code—it’s free, robust, and commonly accessible. Github repositories are owned and access to change them must be enabled by the owner. Still, you can make changes to a Github repository; but a “pull request” must be sent to contributors of the repository and they can accept the change at their discretion. Keeping changes in sync when you don’t have direct change privileges may not be obvious.

One-time Github Changes Read the rest of this entry »

 

PHP Recipe to Show Source-code

19 Nov

PHP source-code display recipeHere is a simple Web 1.5 (static HTML with a little bit of styling and JavaScript) recipe to allow a viewer of your web page to see the PHP source-code, behind it, with a minimal amount of JavaScript and a little CSS manipulation—good for showing the work you’ve done to others. Or for embedding in your own source, in debug mode, so that teammates can see each others’ work.

See the example code at: http://cachecrew.com/sample_code/highlight_file.php and http://cachecrew.com//sample_code/highlight_file2.php.

The PHP and HTML Read the rest of this entry »

 

OS X Command-line Dev Tools—Install Shortcut

12 Nov

Xcode command-line toolsAmong those around me, in world of tech startups (even in the vicinity of the world of Windows), MacBooks are used almost universally. I can’t explain the discrepancy between what I see around me and the data you usually read; but I do know that as a technical platform, OS X provides an easier path to development tools. These days, the world driven by web-based applications. A majority of those applications run on Linux-based machines. OS X shares with Linux, a common ancestor, Unix. So, a robust array of common commands come with OS X—ssh, ftp, bash, vi, emacs, etc. But more importantly, OS X comes pre-installed with hottest development tools used for web development, today—Ruby, Python, PHP, Apache, memcache, etc. This means a developer can write web applications without even being connected to the Internet!

There are more tools available with the free download of Xcode, Read the rest of this entry »

 

Self-documenting Bash Scripts Using Heredoc

22 Jul

It is surprising how quickly we forget how to use scripts we had written, let alone, what they were for. So it is even more difficult for others to know how and whether to use your script. You can avoid wasting the efforts you put into the problems you solved with your script by simply adding some friendly “help” output.

Here is some basic information you should include:

  • Summary description
  • Form of use—basic syntactic usage
  • Description of usage syntax; i.e., input parameters
  • More detailed information, if necessary. Read the rest of this entry »
 

Server Handling of Accept HTTP Headers

31 Aug

When a browser (or any web client) requests content from a web server, it can tell the server what types of content type it can interpret (HTML, text, audio, etc.). The underlying HTTP protocol allows these to be specified via “header” settings—metadata that is sent before any actual content, describing characteristics about the content. The browser can send an “Accept” header—to describe what it accepts—and the server responds with a “Content-type” header. The Accept header can be quite elaborate, but what happens when what happens when these conflict? Read the rest of this entry »

 

The ccPhp Framework: Installation

24 May

I have a whole series of posts, waiting in draft, describing my evolving PHP framework, I call ccPhp. If you have nothing better to do than play with someone else’s dalliances, then here is a quick installation guide.  A little backwards, because I’ve yet to publish reasons why you’d want to. But, if, after my eventual publications describe this framework, you decide to install it, this is the quickest place to see how to do that.

The following describes only one way to arrange the setup.  I have designed the framework with few cross-dependencies.  After my “standard” setup description, I will describe the few file dependencies so that you easily define your own file organization. (If you are on Windows, you can extrapolate the appropriate things to do there). Read the rest of this entry »

 

Crushed Under the Tower of Software-Babble

02 May

BNF Syntax diagrams

I think my brain cells are shrinking—it is unbelievable how quickly I forget. Such is the life of a software developer, these days.It is amazing how quickly I can forget the details of one programming language detail over another after just a few weeks away—when I see my old code, I amaze myself at how good a programmer I was… last month! Read the rest of this entry »

 

Avoid Objective-C Bugs w/Properties and Instance Variables (ivar)

25 Nov

Objective-C is the programming language of choice for iOS an Mac OSX programming, so becoming proficient in native programming for those platforms is essential to building great applications. Apple emphasizes that programmers must understand the “retain-release” model of how to manage objects. True, but this is not enough. Unfortunately, Objective-C makes it exceedingly easy to inadvertently write code that breaks the retain-release model, leading bugs that cause programs to crash.  You can adopt some practices to avoid such problems. Read the rest of this entry »